Sep 202014

This is a follow-up to my post about front-of-the-manual tools in Eastgate’s Tinderbox. It explains how I make the in-text links I discussed there. Because it’s sometimes easier to see things done than to read about it, I’m also including a couple of short screen cap videos. I don’t often post videos and have a spotty record with them. The ones here look like black boxes to me…but they play. If they don’t for you, please let me know by email or Twitter.

Links Within the Same Tab

In-text links within the same tab are pretty straightforward. You simply:

  1. select the anchor text;
  2. click the link button in the text viewer;
  3. drag the button’s link animation to another note;
  4. click “create link” in the pop-up that appears.

The video shows what it looks like in practice. (It also shows how to assign a prototype and how I change the badge of an agenda item to a check mark once it is dealt with in a meeting.)


With these links in place, you can move from the meeting container to an agenda item’s note with a single click.


Links Across Different Tabs

Links across tabs are made in roughly the same way although there are a couple extra steps that allow you to find the note you are looking for. To  make these links, you:

  1. select the anchor text;
  2. click the link button in the text viewer;
  3. drag the button’s link animation to the link placeholder in the upper left corner of the window;
  4. click the tab that has the note you wish to link to;
  5. drag the link animation from the link placeholder to a note;
  6. click “create link” in the pop-up that appears.

Here’s what is looks like in practice:


This example also shows the reason I link from meeting containers to agenda items (i.e. what I demonstrate in the first video). In the future when I need refer to information from this meeting I will link to the meeting container and not the specific note I need. Doing so will bring me to an agenda that lets me access the specific information I’m looking for by using the blue links. But it also provides an overview of the context in which the information originally appeared and lets me click to see that information if I decide it’s useful to me.

Finally, if you don’t have multiple tabs open but wish to link to a note that is not visible in your outline, that’s no problem. Once you’ve dragged your link from the source note to the placeholder, you can dig around and find your destination note. Once you do, you drag the link from the placeholder and finish the process.

In-text Links and Maps

These in-text links show up on maps. Because my admin file has many more links than notes, these links often confuse things rather than clarify them in map view. In my course plan, I deal with this problem by using the inspector to make all but one link type invisible. When I think a particular link will add something to a map, I assign it the visible type using the drop-down menu on the create link pop-up window.

Drop-down Menu for selecting link types.

Drop-down Menu for selecting link types.


Deleting Accidental Links

I make mistakes when I create in-text links. When this happens I hit opt-cmd-L to pull up the “Browse Links” pop-up for the note, find my mistaken link, delete it and then try again.

Links to Files & to the Web

I also create links to files in my dropbox (frequently) and to sites on the web (rarely). These links are held in key attributes for a note. I make them by dragging and dropping the file from a finder window (or the url from my browser) onto the attribute’s field at the top of the note viewer.


 September 20, 2014  Hypertext Tagged with: ,

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